Guest Post from Level Up Health and Fitness

Level Up Guys!

Exercise – you regularly hear about its benefits from reduction, prevention and disease management, to weight loss, muscle tone, bulking up, and the ever so popular, body-sculpting and bikini modelling. It’s a big yes to all of the above-mentioned, and rightly so. Anything that gets your ticker ticking through correct exercise techniques has to be good!

There are also other benefits. There’s lots of research backing up that exercise can help reduce mild to moderate depression.[1] Through moving the body hormones serotonin and endorphins are increased – helpful for lifting the mood and getting a good night’s sleep. Exercise can also helps with anxiety,[2] low confidence and self-esteem. There are also social benefits to be had. Friendships can be forged through meeting others in exercise groups, bringing a buddy along, and connecting with like-minded individuals.[3]

Imagine this, you start exercising regularly when after a while, you have more energy, you start to feel better, your body is in better shape than when you started, and you’re achieving a goal! How awesome is that?

In a nutshell, exercise helps with overall wellbeing – sport’s elite will tell you the same thing but ask anyone who’s been at it for a while.

As a trainer I see clients for different reasons. Most of the time they want to increase their peak oxygen uptake (VO2 Max), increase fitness levels, lose weight, and sometimes they see me to help motivate them, to act as their cheerleader – something I love to do, and to have someone neutral to confide in.

Because a client’s reason is unique to them I would suggest that individuals respond differently to certain exercise types. For example, they may present with chronic conditions, have injuries, are unable to complete certain exercise movements for whatever reason, or it’s their preference.

As no one size fits all, and to achieve a win/win outcome for the client, their training program is customised according to their preferences. I gradually introduce different styles to change the session up so it doesn’t become boring, with the added bonus that the client gets to experience something new – sometimes repeatedly 🙂

At the end of their training session, they’ll leave with either sweat beading everywhere, sore legs/arms (basically wherever there’s a muscle), but the one feature that stands out is the smile on their faces, their shoulders are pulled back with the chest out, and their head is held high. This is that feel good hormone in action – you can see confidence written all over them.

Weeks will pass with my ongoing clients then we revisit our first session. I place a mirror in front of them and show them the difference. Remarkable changes physically – posture pretty much on-point. We then discuss overall emotional and physiological wellbeing. That newfound sense of confidence appears again in that mirror – something not apparent from the first meeting.

Whether your goal is to power lift 150% of your body weight, be more flexible, beat your partner to the finish line in the next run (did you say you never ran before?) or complete more burpee reps, you’ll need to delve deep to step out of your comfort zone, and hard, if feeling depressive and anxious.

Find a personal trainer you know you can trust – Nine times out of 10 they’ve been where you are. The trainer you choose will allow you to experience various styles of physical activity; he or she will be able to tell through observation and talking with you which will be the most appropriate.

We want this to open up a positive and fruitful win/win exercise routine!

In my book, confidence and self-esteem can be dramatically increased through correct exercise prescription from your personal trainer. So, what are you waiting for?

Level Up!

Kristen Hine, Personal Trainer at Level Up Health and Fitness

[1] http://www.blackdoginstitute.org.au/public/getinvolved/exerciseyourmood.cfm
[2] https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/exercise-and-mood/201110/exercise-anxiety
[3] http://www.livestrong.com/article/477451-social-emotional-benefits-of-regular-exercise/